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Chinese pair of Mandain Rank Badges

Reference
5382
Height
29 cm (11 1/2")
Width
30 cm (11 3/4")
Framed Height
49 cm (19 1/4")
Framed Width
49 cm (19 1/4")
Pair of Mandarin Squares / Mandarin Rank badges second rank Golden Pheasant. Made after 1850 but before 1870 all embroidered in the finest of gilt thread. This excellent work and shows great detail to the bird and the background only a skilled embroiderer would have been capable of such fine work.

The border is made up of bats and shou signs for fortune and longevity, see Ladder to the Clouds Beverly Jackson and David Hugus plate 13.015 for a similar border. the back ground behind the bird is made of intense embroidery of ruyi headed clouds, with auspicious Buddhist emblems. the bottom part of the badge shows a stripy turbulent sea.

So many auspicious emblems on a badge indicates that the influence of the Emperor was waning and the Mandarin was trying to provide good luck for himself to enable him to hold such a high office under the next Emperor. The planer the badge the more powerful the Emperors influence.

The second rank Mandarin would hold one of the following positions, Deputy Attendant to the Heir Apparent, vice Presidents for Courts and Boards, Ministers of the Imperial Household, Governor General of the Provinces, superintendent of Finance and Chancellor of the Hanlin Institute.

The fineness of the Badges would suggest a very senior Mandarin.

This pair of Badges are from the mans robe and not his wifes robe. Always desirable to have the exact pair of badges. The badge from the front was made in two sections so that it went either side of the opening on the front of the robe. In conserving badges the front badge is always sewn loosely and carefully together.
Height
29 cm (11 1/2")
Width
30 cm (11 3/4")
Framed Height
49 cm (19 1/4")
Framed Width
49 cm (19 1/4")
Year
1850 - 1870
Medium
Silk and gilt thread
Country
China
Literature
Ladder to the Clouds by Beverly Jackson and David Hugus
Condition
Perfect condition and they have been framed and conserved.